Laura

Laura's Blog Posts

China says it will cut power sector emissions 60% by 2020

As Paris climate talks enter negotiation phase and smog blankets Beijing, China says it will cut CO2 emissions from coal power by 180m tonnes by 2020. China will reduce emissions of major pollutants in the power sector by 60% by 2020, the cabinet announced on Wednesday, after world leaders met in Paris to address climate change. China will also reduce annual carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power generation by 180m tonnes by 2020, the official People’s Daily website said. It did not give comparison figures or elaborate how it would achieve the result.

Read More

Paris, COP21: Poor countries want 100% renewables, not coal

If coal is good for humanity, then someone has forgotten to tell the world’s poorest countries. In a strongly worded statement that came out on the first day of talks at the Paris climate summit, the leaders of 30 of the world’s poorest countries said they wanted the world to be 100 per cent renewable by 2050

Read More

Comment: Why the UK’s coal phaseout is a really big deal

The UK is getting off coal. For real. There’s even a deadline. Energy and Climate Change Secretary Amber Rudd has announced the beginning of the end of coal in the UK, with every single coal power station required to close by 2025 (with a possible loophole for any which buy into carbon capture and storage).

Read More

G20 countries paying AUD$633 billion in subsidies to oil, gas and coal companies: report

A new report has found that the world's biggest economies are paying $633 billion in production subsidies every year to oil, gas and coal companies. The report by US environmental think tank, Oil Change International and UK humanitarian think tank, the Overseas Development Institute, found Australia is paying $7 billion on average annually in production subsidies to fossil fuel producers.

Read More

Global Coal Consumption Heads for Biggest Decline in History

Coal consumption is poised for its biggest decline in history, driven by China’s battle against pollution, economic reforms and its efforts to promote renewable energy. Global use of the most polluting fuel fell 2.3 percent to 4.6 percent in the first nine months of 2015 from the same period last year, according to a report released Monday by the environmental group Greenpeace. That’s a decline of as much as 180 million tons of standard coal, 40 million tons more than Japan used in the same period.

Read More

Coal Industry’s Climate Plan Doesn’t Add Up

Coal producers and lobbyists are yet again promoting "clean coal" as the justification for continued expansion of energy coal as we make the inevitable transition to the low-carbon economy. Conscious that they can no longer credibly reject the evidence of accelerating climate change, the Minerals Council of Australia and the World Coal Association claim that the latest "clean coal" technologies, in the form of lower emission coal plants and carbon capture and storage, are an effective response.

Read More

France makes a bold move on coal finance: Will other countries follow?

This week, French President Hollande made a bold announcement, declaring that France would no longer provide financial support for coal-fired power plants overseas unless they are equipped with technology to capture and store the carbon dioxide emissions. His announcement follows in the steps of President Obama, who announced in 2013 a ban on support for coal plants overseas except in very limited circumstances, and provides a model for other rich countries who are dragging their heels on adopting similar bans.

Read More

In Kenya, Proposed Coal-Fired Power Plant Threatens World Heritage Site

In 2015, only about 23 percent of Kenya's 45,500,000 people have access to electricity, and this problem is particularly pronounced in rural areas of the East African country, where electrification drops to a staggering 4 percent. It's clear that the question is not whether or not something needs to be done -- it is unconscionable to leave people living in energy poverty. Rather, the issue is how do we start delivering energy services as quickly and as broadly as possible?

Read More

New coal-fired power enjoys support among bankers in Germany and Asia

In the northern Greek city of Ptolemaida, a new 660-megawatt power plant that burns lignite, a plentiful soft brown coal, is scheduled to be built by 2020. The European Investment Bank has withdrawn funding from the project because of its high CO2 emissions and other pollutants, but the German government-owned development bank KfW, which has a large portfolio of green investments in Germany, is planning to provide half the money needed, roughly €800 million ($888 million) in loan guarantees.

Read More

Quang Ninh floods highlight need for diversity in power supply

Vietnam’s northeastern province of QuangNinh, home of UNESCO-listed Halong Bay and the country’s coal reserves, suffered from heavy rains last week which led to flood the coal mines. As a result power shortages might occur because several coal mines had to be shut down. Meanwhile stockpiles at some power plants are only sufficient for a short period. Since weather extremes are likely to happen more frequently in the future, events like this highlight the need for a more diversified power mix in Vietnam. This means reducing the reliance on coal and increasing renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and biomass in Vietnam’s power mix.

Read More

World Bank won’t fund coal-related projects in India

The World Bank has made a U-turn on its stance that coal is the backbone of the India's energy economy 17 years after it agreed to lend $1.03 billion to Coal India along with a Japanese lending agency. The international lender has now decided not to invest in any coal-related project, be it a coal mine or a thermal power plant.

Read More

Coal is not ‘good for humanity’: new report

Media Release: A new Oxfam report challenges mining industry spin about coal and poverty, showing clearly that coal is not the solution to improving energy access in developing countries. Powering Up Against Poverty also finds that the Australian Government’s love affair with coal risks putting the country out of step with the rest of the world and harming our economic future, given renewable energy is likely to be the world’s leading source of electricity before 2030.

Read More

What Happens After the Coal Plant Closes?

Roger Titchenell, mayor of Albright, West Virginia, a coal-plant town that lost its coal plant, isn't angry at the Environmental Protection Agency. He's not mad at FirstEnergy Corp. for closing the town's 63-year-old plant, blaming new EPA regulations. Titchenell's frustration is more mundane: He just wishes the company had paid for the new park fence he says it promised when it left town.

Read More

Questions over Rampal coal-fired power plant in Bangladesh

An international organisation has raised serious questions about the much-debated Rampal coal-fired power plant, saying it does not maintain the minimum social and environmental standards."The project poses significant adverse social and environmental risks and impacts that are diverse and irreversible," said Bank Track, a Netherlands-based coalition of organisations "targeting the operations and investments of private sector banks and their effect on people and the planet".

Read More

Myanmar Villagers Stand United Against Coal Plant

After a 10 hour overnight drive from Yangon, we finally arrive in Andin Village. It is starting to rain, turning the red dirt roads into mud, but we can't miss the large "No Coal" sign in Burmese, English, and Mon. Last May, the now empty football field hosted the latest in a series of protests against a proposed 1,280 MW coal-fired power plant from a Thailand-based Japanese company, Toyo-Thai Corporation (TTCL). The proposal also includes a massive new deep sea port to bring in coal from Indonesia and Australia to fuel the boilers. Nearly every house in the village has a "No Coal" sticker in the three languages-distributed as part of a survey of local opinions about the project. Out of 1300 households, we are told only one refused to place a sticker on their home. The rest display their opposition on their homes, cars and motorbikes.

Read More

New coal plants ‘most urgent’ threat to the planet, warns OECD head

New research, published by the OECD on Thursday, has found that, on current trends, coal-fired power generation will result in more than 500bn tonnes of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere between now and 2050. That is the equivalent of about half of the “carbon budget” – the amount of greenhouse gas that we can safely pour into the atmosphere – for this half-century, if we are to stay within the 2C limit that is widely agreed as the threshold for dangerous climate change.

Read More

The Latest Sign That Coal Is Getting Killed

Coal is having a hard time lately. U.S. power plants are switching to natural gas, environmental restrictions are kicking in, and the industry is being derided as the world's No. 1 climate criminal. Prices have crashed, sure, but for a real sense of coal's diminishing prospects, check out what's happening in the bond market

Read More

The coal boom choking China

Chinese miners last year dug up 3.87bn tonnes of coal, more than enough to keep all four of the next largest users – the United States, India, the European Union and Russia – supplied for a year. This new interactive site from The Guardian gives an overview of the impacts of this coal boom on China and it's people.

Read More

Norway’s pension fund to divest $8bn from coal, a new analysis shows

The world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund is set to sell over $8bn (£5bn) of coal-related investments, according to a new analysis. The move by Norway’s trillion dollar fund is set to be confirmed by the country’s parliament on Friday. It is the largest fossil fuel divestment yet, affecting 122 companies across the world, and marking a new success for the fast-growing andUN-backed climate change campaign.

Read More

Inside the War on Coal

The war on coal is not just political rhetoric, or a paranoid fantasy concocted by rapacious polluters. It’s real and it’s relentless. Over the past five years, it has killed a coal-fired power plant every 10 days. It has quietly transformed the U.S. electric grid and the global climate debate

Read More

Coal giant exploited Ebola crisis for corporate gain, say health experts

Public health experts involved in the response to the Ebola crisis have condemned what they described as a ludicrous, insulting and opportunistic attempt to exploit the disease for corporate gain by the world’s largest privately-held coal company. As part of a PR offensive to rebrand coal as a “21st-century fuel” that can help solve global poverty, it has emerged that at the height of Ebola’s impact in Africa, Peabody Energy promoted its product as an answer to Africa’s devastating public health crisis.

Read More

Why keep digging for coal we can’t use?

The fight against lignite mining and burning in Germany is heating up, 6,000 people formed a 7.5 kilometre human chain at the open cast brown coal mine near Garzweiler in North-Rhine Westphalia, marking the threshold that the mine in their opinion mustn’t cross.

Read More

How Not to Build a Power Plant: a Tale From Java Island

The battle in Batang encapsulates all the elements of Indonesia’s struggle to forge a modern economy out of a scattered archipelago of thousands of islands that relied for centuries on farming and natural resources. The loss of precious land, fear of unemployment and pollution, allegations of corruption, and distrust of change permeate the family feuds and protests that have become part of local daily life.

Read More

What big coal’s happy-clappers missed about Vietnam’s growing coal headache

Last week the PR crew at the Minerals Council of Australia’s (MCA) – which represents coal companies including BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, Peabody Energy and Adani – cranked out two Tweets pointing to an article hyping Vietnam as an exemplar of why the world’s poor need coal. However, the MCA was seemingly unaware that just days beforehand a protest against a new coal plant had resulted in a national highway being blocked for 30 hours and prompted the Deputy Prime Minister to castigate the power plant operator for the pollution it caused.

Read More

Private Banks Ditching Destructive Coal Investments, International Financial Institutions Need To Follow Suit

Earlier this week, Barclays Bank did something amazing -- one of the world's largest banks announced it would no longer finance coal-mining companies that pursue the destructive practice of mountaintop removal mining (MTR) in Appalachia. Will the US Export-Import Bank and other public financial institutions also rule out investment in destructive coal mining projects?

Read More

The heavy toll of coal mining in South Africa

Generating more power through coal means more coal must be extracted. But South Africa, which currently generates 90 percent of its electricity through coal, is already struggling with the devastating impacts of more than a century of excessive mining.

Read More

Cameron, Clegg and Miliband sign joint climate pledge

David Cameron, Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband have signed a joint pledge to tackle climate change, which they say will protect the UK’s national security and economic prosperity. The agreement includes a pledge to phase out the use of unabated coal in the United Kingdom, a historic move for the country which pioneered the use of coal during the Industrial Revolution.

Read More

Fossil fuel lobby goes on the attack against divestment movement

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you,” said Mahatma Gandhi. The climate change campaign to divest from fossil fuels seems to be moving through those stages at express speed, with a sudden barrage of attacks from the coal and oil lobbies ahead of its global divestment day on Valentine’s day.

Read More

The Murky and Troubling Maze Behind Adani’s Australian Coal Projects

Australia's largest ever coal project, Adani's proposed Carmichael coal mine in Queensland's Galilee Basin, has been found to have a murky and troubling maze of corporate arrangements spread across known tax havens. At the same time, research released in January shows more clearly than ever that the Carmichael mine and related infrastructure is at profound risk of becoming a stranded asset due to the staggering carbon pollution it would cause. With such high stakes, the apparent lack of accountability and transparency is deeply troubling.

Read More

India and US agree: Coal is not the answer

The agreement struck between Obama and Modi now means that all three of the world’s biggest emitters – India, the US and China – are at least agreed on the importance of striking a strong climate agreement in Paris this year, even if they are not yet on the same page about how this should be done.

Read More

Pressures on coal show no signs of ending

When world leaders assembled at the G20 Summit in Brisbane last month, the corporation selected by the Australian government to address the G20 and spearhead its "thought leadership forum" was none other than United States coal producer Peabody Energy. Exhorting governments to address poverty with coal and other fossil fuels, Peabody's executives had a sure meeting of minds with Prime Minister Tony Abbott, who had made his controversial "coal is our future" comments days earlier. Less telegraphed in this sphere of "thought leadership" are the impending costs of an industry in decline, and what these costs mean for this country.

Read More

Big Coal’s 2014 nightmare

Around the world the coal industry has been confronted with unprecedented opposition – from frontline communities opposing new mines or polluting power stations to the burgeoning divestment movement. As community opposition has grown and the industry has been engulfed in scandals of its own making, political and financial support for the industry has waned. All the indications are that 2015 may well be the year in which Big Coal’s transition towards ‘Little Coal’ accelerates.

Read More

Comment: China coal peak, what the IEA missed

The International Energy Agency (IEA) published its annual Medium-Term Coal Market Report yesterday, with a lot of attention devoted to proffering the notion that China’s coal consumption will continue to grow until the end of this decade, despite a dramatic slowdown this year, and ambitious new energy and climate targets.

Read More

Coal giant exploits the global poor to save its own hide

The outlook for coal — especially thermal coal, the kind used to make electricity — is increasingly grim. Developed countries are seeing flat demand and rapid shifts to natural gas and renewables. Several western investment banks are shifting their funding to renewables. Developing-world demand is still on the rise, but China, which has single-handedly supported coal export markets for over a decade, is planning to cap its use of coal and vastly increase its use of renewable energy by 2020.

Read More

‘Coal Is A Dead Man Walking’: A Look Back At 2014

King Coal ran into a slag heap of bad news in 2014. From a groundbreaking U.S.-China deal to slash carbon pollution, to a plan by the Environmental Protection Agency to impose carbon limits on existing coal-fired power plants, to crumbling prospects for exports to Asia, to more dire predictions of coal plant retirements in coming years, to tanking stock prices for many of the industry’s giants, the U.S. coal industry has little to celebrate this holiday season.

Read More

Toxic Pool Creeping Across India Kills Thousands of Kids Day by Day

Death crept without warning to the mud huts of Jogaeal in central India. One by one, children began to die, often in agony and exhibiting similar symptoms: convulsions, burning pain in the extremities, nausea, vomiting, fever and diarrhea. By the end of 2011, parents buried 53 of them in this forested hill country village occupied mostly by subsistence farmers and day laborers.

Read More

CoalWire 66, 5th December 2014

This week the German Government has announced coal plants will be required to close, Greenpeace have released a major report on pollution from coal mines in South Kalimantan in Indonesia, a Turkish administrative court has rejected environmental assessment reports for a proposed US$2 billion coal power station and the largest Norwegian pension fund manager has announced it is dropping its investments in 27 coal company stocks.

Read More

2014 Grassroots Anti-Coal Movements To Watch

Wherever there are coal mines, coal shipping ports, and power plants around the globe, local communities are fighting back against deadly pollution and economic destruction. Today, the Sierra Club released their fourth annual report on some of the world’s major, ongoing grassroots coal fights around the world. Pitted against unimaginable wealth and power and too often facing violence and intimidation, these are the people that refuse to be silent.

Read More

Smog-choked China cuts a climate deal with Obama, and tries to tame its coal beast

This week’s landmark agreement between the U.S. and China on limiting emissions of carbon dioxide marks a significant diplomatic milestone in the struggle against global climate change. The fact that the two largest sources of CO2 have finally agreed to do something about it should, in theory, give a boost to next year’s United Nations climate summit. Whether the actual terms of the deal—which calls for the U.S. to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 26% to 28%, compared to 2005 levels, by 2025, and for China to cap its emissions by 2030—have a realistic shot at being met is another question.

Read More

G20: Reality bites for coal and climate change

Climate change almost forgotten in the cocoon of a coal sponsored energy forum in Brisbane. In the corporatised and coal-company sponsored cocoon of a pre-G20 talkfest in Brisbane, the burst of vocal protest came like a sudden jolt of the reality of life outside. “Peabody – we don’t want your coal,” came the loud but brief interlude from seven young climate change campaigners who rose to their feet to shout down Glenn Kellow, the chief operating officer of Peabody Energy, the world’s biggest privately owned coal company.

Read More

America’s worst corporate ogre: How Big Coal is shamelessly plotting to stay alive

Just as it once helped Marlboro cigarettes push into Asia at the end of the last millennium, public relations giant Burson-Marsteller is helping Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private coal company, become the dominant supplier to the world’s most ravenous coal market, a role worth billions to Big Coal that could lock in decades of dangerously high carbon emissions

Read More

Are U.S. taxpayer dollars supporting coal industry human rights violations overseas?

A fact finding team of five non-governmental organizations (NGOs) -- the Sierra Club, 350.org, Carbon Market Watch, Friends of the Earth U.S. and Pacific Environment -- released a scathing report, The U.S. Export-Import Bank’s Dirty Dollars, on the rampant human rights abuses at the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) financed Sasan coal-fired power plant and mine in Singrauli, India.

Read More

Rainforest Action Network Applauds Move by U.S. Banks to Reject Australian Coal Plan

Rainforest Action Network commended the move by leading U.S. investment banks to rule out financing the Abbot Point coal export project in Queensland, Australia. Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and JPMorgan Chase all issued written commitments not to bankroll the controversial project—which would involve dredging part of the Great Barrier Reef—under pressure from RAN.

Read More

Caution: Slippery Load Ahead!

Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina suffered many losses and damage this spring when both countries were hit hard by the heaviest rain in 120 years of recorded weather measurements. Official counts indicate that over 1.6 million people were affected in both countries after a week of flooding. Assessments of the damage range up to several billions of dollars. Official figures for the damage in Serbia alone stand at 1.55 billion euros (1.98 billion dollars). The events initiated a large international aid campaign, with numerous countries and organizations donating humanitarian and monetary support for the affected areas.

Read More

Pacific Climate Warriors Target Australia’s Coal Industry

Pacific Climate Warriors from 12 islands in the Pacific paddled traditional canoes into the world's largest coal port in Newcastle Australia this October, drawing attention to the consequences of climate change on their home countries. The Pacific Warriors were joined by hundreds of Australians in kayaks and on surfboards, peacefully delaying ten coal ships scheduled to go through the port during the day. If it were a country, the coal exported from Newcastle would make the port the 9th highest emitting country in the world. The Pacific Warriors came from 12 Pacific Island countries, including Fiji, Tuvalu, Tokelau, Micronesia, Vanuatu, The Solomon Islands, Tonga, Samoa, Papua New Guinea and Niue.

Read More

Will coal exports kill the Great Barrier Reef?

"An icon under pressure." That was how Australia's Great Barrier Reef was described recently by the body that manages it. Stretching along the Queensland coast, the reef is an underwater wonderland home to thousands of different fish and coral species. But it is facing multiple threats. Including coal.

Read More

Australians divided over coal policy

Until recently they were thriving coastal communities. But rising sea levels and erosion, which authorities blame on climate change, this year forced the relocation of the villages of Vunidogoloa and Narikoso in Fiji, creating almost 300 climate refugees. On Friday, a group of South Pacific islanders hit back, taking on what they see as a powerful symbol of their problem in Australia – the world’s second-biggest coal exporter. Boarding traditional canoes they blockaded Newcastle, one of the world’s largest coal ports, to draw attention to global warming.

Read More

Coal and Corruption

Juan Pablo Perez Alfonso, one of the founders of OPEC, once compared the world’s fossil-fuel use to “drowning in the devil’s excrement.” There is certainly plenty of evidence supporting his prediction that the fossil-fuel industry, with its powerful corrupting influence, will “bring us ruin.” Indeed, coal-related corruption stories are breaking worldwide, shining a light on the murky space between “illegal” and “improper” where the extractive industries work.

Read More

In pictures: India’s coal miners

India is the world's third largest coal producing nation and coal supplies 60% of the country's energy needs, but the coal industry is poorly regulated. Arindam Mukherjee photographs some coal miners going about their work in eastern India.

Read More

CoalWire 54, 11th September 2014

China's coal imports drop for the first time since 2009, German coal power generation in August at a 10 year low, First Nation forces Canadian province to freeze coal licenses and criminal charges against coal ship blockaders dropped.

Read More

China’s coal imports drop for the first time since the country became net coal importer

A recently published analysis compiled by Lauri Myllyvirta and Greenpeace International showed the unthinkable -- Chinese coal consumption fell for the first time this century in the first half of this year. Even more striking is the fact that China's gross domestic product (GDP) growth and coal consumption have decoupled, suggesting a structural shift in the Chinese economy.

Read More

South Africa’s coal-fired power stations carry heavy health costs

South Africa’s dependence on coal to generate 85% of its electricity is taking a substantial toll on human health, according to environmental groups. A report from Greenpeace (pdf) in February estimates that up to 2,700 premature deaths are caused every year by emissions from the country’s 16 coal-fired power plants. Greenpeace released the report in the wake of an application by Eskom, South Africa’s public power utility, to postpone compliance with new minimum emissions standards aimed at reducing the damaging health impacts of air pollution.

Read More

Coal To Be Hardest Hit By Fossil Fuel Divestment Campaign

Much has been written in recent months about carbon-stranded assets – investments in fossil fuel projects that may turn out to be worth far less than investors or companies currently think they will because of measures to cut carbon emissions such as emissions trading schemes and regulation.

Read More

All Coal-Mining Rights Issued in India since 1993 Ruled Illegal

NEW DELHI—India's Supreme Court ruled that all coal-mining licenses distributed since 1993 are illegal, creating uncertainty about where Indian power plants and steelmakers will get the coal they need and complicating the new government's efforts to improve the country's business environment.

Read More

India must choose to be champion or villain for climate and development

Sabka saath, sabka vikas: development for everyone. That was the campaign slogan of India's new prime minister Narendra Modi during the recent elections.In about two months, Modi will join other business and political leaders in New York to pledge what they will do to battle climate change. India is a climate lynchpin, as it has historically argued that southern countries cannot take action on climate change because they need to develop first. But countries like India can – and should – develop and tackle climate change at the same time.

Read More

China’s Energy Plans Will Worsen Climate Change, Greenpeace Says

BEIJING — China’s plans for 50 coal gasification plants will produce an estimated 1.1 billion tons of carbon dioxide per year and contribute significantly to climate change, according to a report released Wednesdayby Greenpeace East Asia.The plants, aimed in part at reducing pollution from coal-fired power plants in China’s largest cities, will shift that pollution to other regions, mostly in the northwest, and generate enormous amounts of carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas produced by fossil fuels, said the organization, which is based in Beijing.

Read More

China’s Thirst for Coal is Drying Up

As the "airpocalypse" news out of China continues to grow, what we predicted more than a year ago is now increasingly obvious -- China's seemingly endless coal demand is a myth, and the Chinese coal boom is over.

Read More

On the Contrary World Bank President Dr. Kim, Renewable Energy is the future

In the 21st century, it's hard to take anyone seriously who thinks coal, not clean energy, is the future for dynamic, emerging economies. But that's exactly what Dr. Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank, did this week during the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. Dr. Kim disparaged clean energy as incapable of powering development and even worse, suggested coal needed to remain on the table for the World Bank to be "taken seriously."

Read More

The future of coal in China, India, Australia, the US, EU and UK

Have reports of coal's demise been greatly exaggerated? It depends which part of the world you look at. Global coal use has grown significantly over the last decade, with global demand increasing 60 per cent between 1990 and 2011, according to research body the International Energy Agency (IEA). With some countries implementing climate policies to limit the use of polluting fuels, some commentators are predicting coal's imminent demise.

Read More

India’s faltering energy production damage water resources demand Modi’s close attention

Narendra Modi, India’s new prime minister, swept into office in May on a message of aspiration, and a reputation for action. During the nearly 13 years that Modi served as chief minister of Gujarat, before becoming the prime minister, his successes included drastically curtailing the number of hours that manufacturers in India’s premier industrial state went without electricity.

Read More

The Great Barrier Reef and the coal mine that could kill it

These are dark days for Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. On 29 July, the last major regulatory hurdle facing the development of Australia’s largest coal mine was removed by Greg Hunt, minister for the environment. The Carmichael coal mine, owned by India’s Adani Group, will cover 200 sq km and produce 60m tonnes of coal a year – enough to supply electricity for 100 million people.

Read More

Pollution triples mercury levels in ocean surface waters study finds

Toxic metal threatens marine life as it accumulates faster in shallow layers than in deep sea due to human activity. The amount of mercury near the surface of many of the world’s oceans has tripled as the result of our polluting activities, a new study has found, with potentially damaging implications for marine life as the result of the accumulation of the toxic metal.

Read More

The World Bank’s New Environmental and Social Policies Fail to Tackle Climate Change

Over the last two years, the Bank has been reviewing its environmental and social safeguard policies. The review process presents an important opportunity for the Bank to adopt best practices for promoting low-carbon and resilient development by establishing strong policy language on climate change. Nonetheless, a draft of proposed new policies does not address climate issues systematically.

Read More

Peak Coal: why the industry’s dominance may soon be over

The coal industry has achieved stunning growth in the last decade, largely due to increased demand in China. But big changes in China’s economy and its policies are expected to put an end to coal’s big boom. After a decade in which coal has been grabbing an ever-larger share of the world’s energy supply, could coal’s boom be about to turn to bust? Both the United States and China are planning to curb coal, and analysts say the repercussions for the global industry could be dramatic. The world may soon breathe a great deal easier, as the biggest contributor to both urban smog and climate change goes into decline.

Read More

CoalWire 43, 26th June 2014

Carbon Capture and Storage enters twilight zone, Japan funds Indonesian transmission project and Czech Republic ponders coal power phase out

Read More

CoalWire 37, 15th May 2014

Forty hours in jail for Mahan's forests, its people and their rights, Indonesian Community Leaders arrested for coal activism and Thiess Indian coal plans ended by landowner opposition

Read More

CoalWire 27, 6th March 2014

Major Indian coal plant builder turns to solar, Indian activists hold national coal convention and Thousands rally to resist mining in the Mahan forests.

Read More

Australian Coal Is Not the Poverty-fighting Saviour for India

On August 12th, I stood with dozens of young Indians at the Annual General Meeting of the Indian-owned infrastructure company, GVK, in protest of their plans to dig up millions of tonnes of coal from Queensland's Galilee Basin and ship it to India. We are not fighting the reality that India needs energy to bring millions of our people out of poverty, but we are fighting the myth that coal is the solution.

Read More

India’s Coal Illusion

The biggest untold story in the world is now out in the open. Despite warnings from the World Bank about the dangers of unchecked climate change the coal industry has a global pipeline of nearly 1,200 plants planned, 2/3 of which are in India and China. India alone has plans to build a coal fleet nearly twice the size of the entire U.S. coal fleet. But if this pipeline has you thinking that a coal-fired future is inevitable, think again. These grandiose plans are an illusion the coal industry seeks to maintain because the truth is the majority of this global pipeline is nothing but vapor.

Read More