Reports

Overheating: Financial Risks from water constraints on Power Generation in Asia

This report from HSBC Climate Change and World Resources Institute finds that emerging Asia is projected to have the fastest growth rate of power consumption in the world yet the availability and quality of freshwater is rapidly declining in many parts of South and Southeast Asia due to demographic pressures and climate change. Furthermore over half of existing and planned capacity for major power companies is located in areas that are considered to be water scarce or stressed.

Coal’s Assault on Human Health

This report from Physicians for Social Responsibility outlines the human health impacts of coal, with a focus on the United States. Each step of the coal lifestyle - mining, transportation, washing, combustion and disposing of post combustion waste - impacts human health. Coal pollutants affect all major body organ systems and contribute to four of the five leading causes of mortality in the United States.

Waste Deep: filling mines with coal ash is profit for industry but poison for people

This report from EarthJustice argues for federal regulations on coal combustion waste disposal, in particular safeguards that ensure companies reveal the toxicity of the waste they are dumping, identify sources of ground and surface water that are susceptible to contamination from the dumping and prohibit the dumping of waste directly into ground water. Federal regulations must also require long-term, comprehensive monitoring for pollution from the dumping and ensure that mine owners are financially responsible for the clean up.

The True Cost of Coal: how people and the planet are paying the price for the world’s dirtiest fuel

This report from Greenpeace outlines the external social and environmental costs of coal. The fact is that coal is the most polluting energy source around, and the dominant source of the world’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Coal may be the cheapest fossil fuel on the market, but its market price is only half the story. The financial price includes a range of factors, from mining and retailing costs to government taxes and, of course, profit, but it ignores some of the biggest taxes, and costs of coal: the tremendous human and environmental damage it causes.