Blogs

Are U.S. taxpayer dollars supporting coal industry human rights violations overseas?

A fact finding team of five non-governmental organizations (NGOs) -- the Sierra Club, 350.org, Carbon Market Watch, Friends of the Earth U.S. and Pacific Environment -- released a scathing report, The U.S. Export-Import Bank’s Dirty Dollars, on the rampant human rights abuses at the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) financed Sasan coal-fired power plant and mine in Singrauli, India.

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Caution: Slippery Load Ahead!

Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina suffered many losses and damage this spring when both countries were hit hard by the heaviest rain in 120 years of recorded weather measurements. Official counts indicate that over 1.6 million people were affected in both countries after a week of flooding. Assessments of the damage range up to several billions of dollars. Official figures for the damage in Serbia alone stand at 1.55 billion euros (1.98 billion dollars). The events initiated a large international aid campaign, with numerous countries and organizations donating humanitarian and monetary support for the affected areas.

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Pacific Climate Warriors Target Australia’s Coal Industry

Pacific Climate Warriors from 12 islands in the Pacific paddled traditional canoes into the world's largest coal port in Newcastle Australia this October, drawing attention to the consequences of climate change on their home countries. The Pacific Warriors were joined by hundreds of Australians in kayaks and on surfboards, peacefully delaying ten coal ships scheduled to go through the port during the day. If it were a country, the coal exported from Newcastle would make the port the 9th highest emitting country in the world. The Pacific Warriors came from 12 Pacific Island countries, including Fiji, Tuvalu, Tokelau, Micronesia, Vanuatu, The Solomon Islands, Tonga, Samoa, Papua New Guinea and Niue.

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As China and the US move away from coal, could global emissions really peak?

For the past decade, the two biggest reasons for despair for those who favour strong action to stop climate change, and the top two excuses for those who don’t, have been the rapid increase in coal-burning in China and inaction in the US.But in the past few years, to the surprise of many, both these countries have taken major steps away from coal. Their move opens up a crucial window of opportunity to achieve what many thought was a lost cause – a peak in global emissions of heat-trapping gases well before 2020.

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