Resources

Unburnable Carbon: are the world’s financial markets carrying a carbon bubble?

There are more fossil fuels listed on the world’s capital markets than we can afford to burn if we are to prevent dangerous climate change. This report quantifies how bad the overshoot is, company by company, stock exchange by stock exchange. Nowhere in the financial chain does the capital market recognise, or quantify, the possibility that governments will do what they say they will in regards to emissions reductions. This is a huge oversight, and there are serious financial risks if the fossil fuel reserves or 'assets' held by publicly listed companies becoming stranded as countries begin to shift towards a low carbon economy.

Freshwater use by U.S power plants: Electricity’s thirst for a precious resource

Across the world the water demand from coal power plants is combining with pressure from growing populations and other needs and straining water resources, especially during heat waves and droughts. This report from the Union of Concerned Scientists is the first systematic assessment of both the effects of power plant cooling on water resources across the United States and the quality of information available to help public and private sector decision makers make water smart energy choices.

The Toll from Coal: An Updated Assessment of Death and Disease from America’s Dirtiest Energy Source

Among all industrial sources of air pollution, none poses greater risks to human health and the environment than coal fired power plants. Emissions from coal power plants contribute to global warming, ozone smog, haze and perhaps most consequential of all from a public health standpoint, fine particle pollution. This study by the Clean Air Task Force outlines the burden of death and disease from coal based electricity production across the United States.

Overheating: Financial Risks from water constraints on Power Generation in Asia

This report from HSBC Climate Change and World Resources Institute finds that emerging Asia is projected to have the fastest growth rate of power consumption in the world yet the availability and quality of freshwater is rapidly declining in many parts of South and Southeast Asia due to demographic pressures and climate change. Furthermore over half of existing and planned capacity for major power companies is located in areas that are considered to be water scarce or stressed.