Water

Devastation from coal mining in South Kalimantan, Indonesia

Greenpeace has uncovered evidence that the intensive coal mining activities in Indonesia’s South Kalimantan province are discharging toxic pollution into rivers, and in some instances, violating national standards for wastewater discharges from mines. Local environmental authorities have failed to stop or prevent the violations. Due to the large amount of coal mining, almost half of the province’s rivers are at risk of being affected by water pollution from the mines. Climate and energy campaigner Arif Fiyanto blogs about the impact of coal mining on South Kalimantan

Revealed: Coal Mines polluting South Kalimantan’s water

Greenpeace has uncovered evidence that the intensive coal mining activities in Indonesia’s South Kalimantan province are discharging toxic pollution into rivers, and in some instances, violating national standards for wastewater discharges from mines. Local environmental authorities have failed to stop or prevent the violations. Due to the large amount of coal mining, almost half of the province’s rivers are at risk of being affected by water pollution from the mines.

Coal impacts on water

Coal is one of the most-water intensive methods of generating electricity. A typical coal plant withdraws enough water to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool every three and a half minutes. This article summarises the major threats to global water resources from coal expansion.

A Clash of Competing Necessities: water adequacy and electric reliability in China, India, France and Texas

This report assesses options to avoid or reduce the growing conflict between power generation and water use. It documents the water and cost benefits of reducing water demand through end-use efficiency, the lower water demand of gas over coal and the zero or negligible water use and other pollution from renewables.